Many organizations work with street children.  Mexico Child Link works with street children who also have a learning disability.

What is Mexico Child Link?

 

Resettlement in Coyay
-
a Totonac Indian town in the Sierra Norte

 

Mexico factfile

 

Article on politics of Cuetzalan

 

Photographs of the Mexico Child Link project in Atlixco, Puebla

 

What are street children?

 

Churches of Acatepec and Tonantzintla

 

 

 

Cuetzalan

  • Cuetzalan is located 180 km North East of Puebla City.
  • It is a Nahuatl Indian town which has preserved many of its customs and traditions
  • It has an extensive network of underground caves which attract cavers and potholers from all over the world.
  • It is a 3 1/2 hour drive from Puebla City via Amozoc, Zaragosa, and Zacapoaxtla.
  • There are direct buses from Puebla and Mexico City
  • Its population in the 2001 census was given as 44,959.
  • Map of Puebla State

A Nahuatl Indian town in Puebla State, Mexico


Faces and Images from Cuetzalan

Nahuatl Indian man in the Sunday "Tianguis"

Nahuatl Indian man in the Sunday "Tianguis"

Market trader in Cuetzalan

Market trader in Cuetzalan

Craftwork in the Sunday market

Craftwork in the Sunday market

Nahua indian woman making "gorditas" at a food stall

Nahua Indian woman making "gorditas" at a food stall

Contact us:


 

 


 

Cuetzalan is a world away from the modern Mexico of Puebla or Mexico City. Although most residents can also speak Spanish, Nahuatl is the language of the streets and markets.
It's a shock to the system for the fluent Spanish speaker, used to listening in to the general chatter. Nahuatl has no linguistic relation to Spanish, having an independent grammar and structure. Evesdropping on two elderly Nahuatl speaking women in the back of the colectivo pick-up, the only words I picked up were "caballo" (horse) and café orgánico (organic coffee)
The Aztecs never saw a horse or a coffee plantation until after the arrival of the conquistadores, so the Indigenous language had to "borrow" the words from Spanish.

Indeed, the Spanish language does the same with English, due to the influence of the powerful neighbour to the north.
At a recent child care conference in Puebla, the chairperson used phrases like "el know-how" and "el business"

Daybreak in Cuetzalan zócalo

Nahua Indian campesino walking into Cuetzalan

Nahua Indian campesino walking into Cuetzalan for the Sunday market

A chat between traders before the day's work begins

A chat between market traders before the day's work begins

Nahua Indian woman and child

Nahua Indian woman and child

 

2009 Mexico Child Link © All Rights Reserved. 80 Locksley Park, Belfast, BT10 0AS. Tel (028) 90622239